Some Positive Climate-actions for Petroleum Oil and Its Derivatives

Petroleum Oil and its derivatives are fossil-based fuels that are used widely in cars, ships, and planes; they are also used for industry-thermal processes, heating, and in producing electricity—through burning/ combustion processes that normally generates Greenhouse Gasses (GHG), the bulk of which are Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The extraction and transport of the said Oil have also, in several occasions, sparked major conflicts and oil spills that consequently harmed the ecosystems and water quality.

The scientific debate on GHG (particularly CO2) as the major cause of Climate Change has long been concluded, and it is on this premise that we should discourage the drilling, refining, and consuming of said Oil for energy—and other similar and/ or related activities.

Figure 1 – CO2-emissions from burning of Petroleum Oil

Sample courses of action

  • Governments imposing limits on oil drilling and exploration, removing subsidies, and taxing oil.
  • Universities, corporations, and individuals divesting from oil companies.
  • Shifting to non fossil-fueled transport vehicles, where practicable.
  • Financial services industry (e.g., banks) or global development institutions (e.g., World Bank) limiting access to capital for exploration, drilling, refining, and delivery.

Big Message

  • When a steep oil tax is the only action implemented, there will be no dramatic reduction in global-temperature, as the natural shifts to coal and natural gas will offsett any reduction in oil usage.

Some Key Dynamics

  • Just like any commodity, when oil is discouraged by taxing, its demand will automatically be reduced.
  • However, depending on its price elasticity of demand, shifts toward to coal, gas an other substitute is possible. Unless there are restrictions on coal and gas, their demand will go up in response to expensive oil. We call this the “squeeze the balloon” problem – depressing fossil fuel emissions in one area causes them to pop up in another. Renewable sources are also boosted slightly, but the impact is negligible. Adding a carbon price is a good solution to the “squeeze the balloon” problem, as it addresses all fossil fuels together.
  • Because of these possible shifting of sources, the net result of taxing oil is no change in overall greenhouse gas emissions and no reduction in future temperature.
  • Another possible shift when taxing oil results in an increase in electrification of the vehicle fleet as electric powered modes of transport become more affordable in the face of higher oil prices.

Potential Co-Benefits

  • A reduction in oil drilling could lead to fewer oil spills, helping protect wildlife habitats, biodiversity, and ecosystem services at production sites and along transportation routes.
  • Reduced economic dependence on oil can improve national security and lower military costs.

Equity Considerations

  • The oil industry provides many high-paying jobs for people with technical trade backgrounds. Providing pathways for these people to find new jobs will be essential.
  • Oil companies wield enormous economic and political power locally and globally. In order to discourage oil, certain industry protections must be eliminated.
  • There is a history of oil refineries being located in marginalized communities and companies working to avoid or limit environmental regulations.

Remarks

My upcoming Blog on this subject will quantitatively assess the effects of various Oil policy-scenarios on the established climate-metrics of post-industrial global mean Temperature-Increase and Sea-level Rise, using the world climate simulator EnROADS.

Standby…


References: 1.) EnROADS Reference Guide, 2.) U.N. webpage https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climate-change/

“4SocialDancing” – a playlist of dance-able tunes of yesteryear.

I. Introduction

This blog is about my collection of 18 popular dance-able tunes of yesteryear i.e., roughly, more than an hour (01:10:32H, to be exact) of dancing and/or listening pleasure.

You have the option of playing it on your Browser OR, using the Soundcloud App which I recommend. Uninterrupted sequential-listening can be achieved by clicking on the White PLAY-button in the Soundcloud-player below, which also toggles as a PAUSE-button.

Fig. 00 – Soundcloud Dashboard

Selective playing can also be done by scrolling the tracks-gallery above and click-toggling on the selection-icons at the left side—this, may require clicking on the X-icon at the player’s top-right corner when moving back to the selection-menu.

If you are brought to or, happen to land at the Soundcloud playlist-website, you may do the following:

  1. PLAY/ PAUSE a particular track by clicking on its image-icon which will automatically convert into a play/pause-button.
  2. MORE SONGFACTS can be viewed by clicking on the song-title.
  3. Clicking the webpage’s BACK-ARROW (<-) will bring you back, to the webpage where you came from.

A. Rationale

I love to dance, and found it to be an effective way to satisfy our basic socialization instinct. To all of us who share this passion, I dedicate this project.

I also have, in several occassions, heard the Electronic Dance Music (EDM) being played in the air-waves and dance-floors—mostly, by Millenials. While I appreciate any kind of music that conform to my current mood, but I am worried that if the current momentum of EDM will persist, the traditional social-dance music will eventually become extinct.

It was on this note that I did my own research and documentation of all dance-genres that impacted my life since childhood, and enticed some of my cyber-musician friends to remotely collaborate with me for this project.

B. Track Selection, Processes and Resources

Selecting the eighteen tracks posed a great challenge to me as I practically loved all the tunes that I have covered. It was, therefore, with a heavy heart that I did it with the help of the following criteria i.e., the tunes must:

  1. Be already available in my current Soundcloud archives;
  2. Have been been originally released during the decades when I have personal experience on them—more particularly the 1950-2000s; and
  3. Maximize the inclusion of dance-genres during the above mentioned era—at least, one track each.

All the selections in this playlist were remotely recorded thru the Soundtrap cloud-facility, in collaboration with my cyber-musician friends. Mixing and mastering was done by MIDWAV Audio Arts, Graphic-support was provided by PASGARTS, and project-managed by yours truly.

II. The Playlist

Based on the above mentioned criteria, listed below are the dance-music artists/ tunes that were included—in the same sequence that they are presented in the playlist:

  1. Dean Martin – “Sway”, 1954;
  2. Fred Buscaglione – “Criminal Tango”, 1957;
  3. Chuck Berry – “Rock and Roll Music”, 1957;
  4. Chubby Checker – “Let’s Twist Again”, 1960;
  5. Engelbert Humperdinck – “The Last Waltz”, 1967
  6. VST & Company – “I-swing Mo Ako”, 1977;
  7. The Bee Fees – “Stayin Alive”, 1977;
  8. Gary Moore – “Pariesienne Walkways”, 1978;
  9. Irene Cara – “Fame”, 1980;
  10. Michael Jackson – “Billie Jean”, 1982;
  11. Irene Cara – “Flashdance – What A feeling”, 1983;
  12. Sade – “Smooth Operator”, 1983;
  13. Kaoma – “Lambada”, 1989;
  14. Los Del Rio – “Macarena”, 1996;
  15. Santana and Rob Thomas – “Smooth”, 1999;
  16. Santana and Product G&B – “Maria Maria”, 1999;
  17. Luis Fonsi et al – “Despacito”, 2016; and
  18. Camilia Cabello – “Havana”, 2017.

The selections were, by intent, all executed with Rock-flavors (N.B.: Bass & Drum lines) and presented chronologically starting from the sociable Tangos of the 50s, up until the advent of Electronic Dance Music (EDM), but not limited to the following dance-genre: 1-Waltz/ 2-Tango/ 3-Slow-dance/ 4-Rock&Roll/ 5-Boogie/ 6-Swing*/ 7-Twist/ 8-Cha-cha/ 9-Rumba/ 10-Lambada/ 11-Macarena/ 12-Reggae/ 13-Hip-hop.

III. Track Contents

More information on each of the playlist-contents are presented in the same sequence below, and selective listening to each can likewise be done by clicking on the corresponding artwork-images.

A. “Sway” Theme (3:14′)

Fig. 1 – “Sway” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Dean Martin’s 1954 Latin-bossa hit “Sway”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm guitar by Mon Enriquez; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Electric grand piano by Wilson H.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Words and music by Pablo Beltran Ruiz and Norman Gimbel.

B. “Criminal Tango” Theme (3:32′)

Fig. 2 – “Criminal Tango” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Fred Buscaglione’s 1957 tango hit “Criminal Tango”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead distorted electric guitar by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Words and music by Sly Dunbar et al.

C. “Rock & Roll Music” Theme (2:28′)

Fig. 3 – “Rock & Roll Music” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Chuck Berry’s 1957 rock & roll hit “Rock & Roll Music”—which was further popularized by the Beatles in the 60s. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead distorted electric guitar by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Words and music by Sly Dunbar et al.

D. “The Twist” Theme (2:07′)

Fig. 4 – “The Twist” Theme

An instrumental cover of Chubby Checker’s 1960 rock & roll hit “The Twist”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Trumpet by Jerome L.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Trombone by Clemens W.; Words and music by Hank Ballard and Nathalie Nath .

E. “The Last Waltz” Theme (3:21′)

Fig. 5 – “The Last Waltz” Theme

A rock-flavored instrumental cover of Engelbert Humperdinck’s 1967 slow pop-rock hit “The Last Waltz”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead jazz guitar by Romy R.; Electric grand piano by Clemens W.; Keyboard synthesizer by Dexter C.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Words and music by Barry Mason and Les Reed.

F. “I-swing Mo Ako” Theme (2:41′)

Fig. 6 – “I-swing Mo Ako” Theme

An instrumental cover of VST & Company’s 1977 Pinoy/OPM-Swing hit “I-swing Mo Ako”. More songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Trumpet by Jerome B.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Acoustic piano by Clemens W.; Words and music by VST & Company.

G. “Stayin Alive” Theme (4:46′)

Fig. 7 – “Stayin Alive” Theme

Th A rock-flavored instrumental cover of The Bee Gees’ 1977 pop-rock hit “Stayin Alive”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead jazz guitar by Romy R.; Electric grand piano by Clemens W.; Keyboard synthesizer by Dexter C.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Words and music by Barry Mason and Les Reed.

H. “Parisienne Walkways” Theme (6:44′)

Fig. 8 – “Parisienne Walkways” Theme

An instrumental-cover of Gary Moore’s 1978 bluesy slow-rock hit “Pariesienne Walkways”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead overdrive electric guitar by Romy R.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Trumpet by Clemens W.; Keyboard synthesizer by Wilson How; Words and music by Gay Moore.

I. “Fame” Theme (4:56′)

Fig. 9 – “Fame” Theme

An instrumental-cover of Irene Cara’s 1980 pop-rock hit, “Fame”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Acoustic guitar and overall direction by Mon Enriquez; Electric Piano by Dexter C.; Keyboard-synthesizer by Romy R.; Trumpet by Wilson H.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision Bass by Bonnie B.; Words & Music by Dean Pitchford, Michael Gore .

J. “Billie Jean” Theme (4:40′)

Fig. 10 – “Billie Jean” Theme

An instrumental cover of Michael Jackson’s 1982 pop rock hit “Billie Jean”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Trumpet by Clemens W.; Words and music by Michael Jackson .

K. “Flashdance – What A Feeling” Theme (3:33′)

Fig. 11 – “Flashdance – What A Feeling” Theme

An instrumental-cover of Irene Cara’s 1983 pop-rock hit, “Flashdance – What A feeling”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Acoustic guitar and overall direction by Mon Enriquez; Electric Piano by Dexter C.; Keyboard-synthesizer #1 by Romy R.; Trumpet by Wilson H.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision Bass by Bonnie B.; Words by Irene Cara & Keith Forsey; Music by Giorgio Moroderand .

L. “Smooth Operator” Theme (4:44′)

Fig. 12 – “Smooth Operator” Theme

An instrumental-cover of Sade’s 1983 pop-rock-bossa hit, “Smooth Operator”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Acoustic guitar and overall direction by Mon Enriquez; Electric Piano Piano by Dexter C.; Keyboard-synthesizer by Romy R.; Trumpet by Wilson H.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision Bass by Bonnie B.; Words and Music Sade adu and Ray St. John .

M. “Dancando Lambada” Theme (4:20′)

Fig. 13 – “Dancando Lambada” Theme

An instrumental cover of Kaoma’s 1989 latin-pop-rock hit “Lambada”—a tune written and recorded by the Bolivian Andean pop group Los Kjarkas in 1981 bearing the title “Chorando Se Foi (Lambada).” More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm guitar by Mon Enriquez; Trumpet by Jonathan C.; Electric grand piano by Dexter C.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Words and music by the Bolivian Andean pop group Los Kjarkas 1981 .

N. “Macarena” Theme (3:50′)

Fig. 14 – “Macarena” Theme

An instrumental cover of Los Del Rio’s 1996 latin-pop-rock hit “Macarena”—a song that also popularized a dance-craze of the same title back in the late 90s. More songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm guitar by Mon Enriquez; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Electric piano by Dexter C.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Words and music by Jesus Bola and Manuel Soler .

O. “Smooth” Theme (4:49′)

Fig. 15 – “Smooth” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Santana and Rob Thomas’ 1999 Latin jazz-rock fusion hit “Smooth”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performer(s)/ Writer(s): Rhythm acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead distorted electric guitar by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Trumpet by Clemens W.; Words and music by Rob Thomas and Itaal Shur .

P. “Maria Maria” Theme (3:47′)

Fig. 16 – “Maria Maria” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Santana and Product G&B’s 1999 R&B hit “Maria Maria”—which won the 2000 Grammy for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. Just the same its lyrics are being provided below, and more songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rythym acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead distorted electric guitar by Romy R.; Drums and percussions by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Words and music by Wycleaf Jean et al .

Q. “Despacito” Theme (3:07′)

Fig. 17 – “Despacito” Theme

An instrumental rendition of Luis Fonsi et al’s 2016 Latin-reggae hit “Despacito”—a song that revitalized the Latin pop music in the mainstream music scene once again. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm nylon-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Harmonica by Clemens W.; Lead acoustic jazz-guitar by Dexter C.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Keyboard synthesizer by Romy R.; Words and music by Erika Ender, Luis Fonsi and Ramon Ayala .

Q. “Havana” Theme (3:35)

Fig. 18 – “Havana” Theme

A rock-flavored instrumental cover of Camilia Cabello’s 2017 Rumba/ Slow-Chacha dance-hit “Havana”. More song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Rhythm acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Acoustic piano by Romy R.; Electric piano by Dexter C.; Trumpet by Clemens W.; Drums and percussion by Mike D.; Precision bass guitar by Bonnie B.; Words and music by Camilia Cabello et al.

IV. Concluding Remarks

I hope that I was able to cover most, if not all, of the traditional dance-genre—as differentiated from the currently in vogue Electronic Dance Music (EDM).

THANK YOU Lord, for the music; to the -audience for taking the time to listen; and likewise, to the following cyber session-musicians who have contributed their talents to this project—-their respective roles were duly acknowledged in each track that they were involved: Brodie, Bonnie (US), Bulax; Flor (GB), Cable, Dexter (US); Dalaws, Mike (PR); Dews, Alex (CH); Enriquez, Mon (PH); How, Wilson (SG); Lubugues, Nancy (UK); Rodowsky, Romy (HR); and Wuger, Clemens (AT).

This project have demonstrated how the limitations in Time and Space can be overcome, by embracing the state-of-the-art AI, SCM and ICT technologies that resulted to enhanced quality and efficiency in showcasing their respective talents to an extended audience.

Depending on the feedback that I will be receiving, a second-volume may be justified in the near future. Plans are already underway for possible CD-publishing and online-streaming. Updates will be posted in our Facebook-page—do Visit/ Follow/ Like us there…

Fig. 19 – MF&TG Facebook Page

(For comments/ suggestions, use the box provided below)

The Best of Mon Enriquez & His Guitar – the playlist/ album.

I. Introduction

This blog is about my recent 16-tracks playlist that were extracted from the solo-acoustic tracks that I have released during the past six-years, after getting-off the fastlane of my corporate career i.e., about 46 minutes continuous-playtime of my personal choice acoustic songs and music.

Unawaringly, I now have uploaded well over 200 recorded songs and music tracks to my Soundcloud sites, cutting across the classical, folk-rock, slow-rock, pop-rock, and to some extent latin-jazz-rock genres—in both their solo-acoustic and full-band renditions.

A. Rationale

The idea of developing this solo-acoustic playlist came about from a fan-inquiry that was brought to my attention recently i.e., the possibility of publishing some of my songs collection either by online-streaming and/ or CD-formats.

Secondly, I also longed of expressing my “Harana” (Eng.: Serenade) instinct that I acquired during my youth. The Harana culture has been long gone and forgotten, but it provides us with a romantic heritage that we could nostalgically look back to.

My provincial teen-life back in the 70s, revolved around my studies, house-chores, basketball games and nighttime serenade sorties—more particularly, during school-breaks when pretty lasses from the various city study-centers flock to our province, to spend their vacations. That was the time when you really have to bring/ hand carry your Guitar if you want to showcase your guitar-playing talent i.e. there were still no internet, no wifi, no music streaming, no facebook etc.

Because of its accessibility/ inexpensiveness, simplicity, mobility, and (most of all) romantic multi-timbre capability, my musical tool of choice back then was the Guitar. Undeniably, it has contributed a lot to my musical awareness, growth and maturity.

B. Track Selection, Processes and Resources

Selecting the sixteen tracks posed a great challenge to me. I loved all the song that I covered, so it was with a heavy heart that I did it with the help of the following criteria:

  1. The song must be already available in my current Soundcloud archives;
  2. The song must be acoustic-friendly, particularly with the Guitar;
  3. The song has been released prior to the turn of the century—more particularly, during the 1960-1990s; and
  4. The playlist must maximize the participation of musical artists that I idolized during the above mentioned era—at least, one track each.

All the selections in this playlist were recorded, mixed, and mastered by MIDWAV Audio Arts—a few instances, with a little help from my friends at Soundtrap; the necessary Graphic-support was provided by PASGARTS; Guitar music- and/ or tab-sheets courtesy of GuitarPro/ PowerTab; and I personally performed and directed their respective productions, this playlist included.

II. The Playlist

Based on the above mentioned criteria, I managed to include the following great artists of the 70s, in the same sequence that they are presented in the playlist:

  1. Don McLean – And I Love You So,
  2. Simon & Garfunkel – For (Emily), Wherever I May Find Her,
  3. Elton John – Your Song,
  4. Michael Johnson – I’ll Always Love You,
  5. Stephen Stills – One and Sixty (Four and Twenty),
  6. John Denver – My Old Guitar,
  7. James Taylor – Something In The way She Moves,
  8. Eric Clapton – Tears In Heaven,
  9. Gordon Lightfoot – If You Could Read My Mind,
  10. Don McLean, – Castle in the Air,
  11. Jim Croce – I’ll Have To Say I love You In A Song,
  12. Peter, Paul & Mary – Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright,
  13. Sting – Fields of Gold,
  14. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young – See The Changes,
  15. *Mon Enriquez – Hug and Handshake, and
  16. Francisco Tarrega – Capricho Arabe.

I, however, took some exceptions of including one of my original musical creation, “Hug and Handshake” (Track#15) and my favorite acoustic-guitar-solos, “Capricho Arabe” (Track#16), which culminated my formal guitar training and (in the process, by choice) aborted my aspirations of becoming a classical guitarist—under the erstwhile tutelage of Maestro Jose Valdez.

A. Listening directly to the playlist

Uninterrupted sequential-listening to this playlist can be achieved by clicking on the White PLAY-button in the Soundcloud-player below, which also toggles as a PAUSE-button.

Soundcloud Player

Selective playing can also be done by scrolling the tracks-gallery above and click-toggling on the selection-icons at the left side—this, may require clicking on the X-icon at the player’s top-right corner when moving back to the selection-menu.

B. The Soundcloud playlist-site

If you are brought to/ happen to land at the Soundcloud playlist-site, you may do the following:

  1. PLAY/ PAUSE a particular track by clicking on its image-icon which will automatically convert into a play/pause-button.
  2. MORE SONGFACTS can be viewed by clicking on the song-title.
  3. Clicking the webpage’s BACK-ARROW (<-) will bring you back, to the webpage where you came from.

III. Track Contents

More information on each of the playlist-contents are presented in the same sequence below, and listening to each can likewise be done by clicking on the corresponding artwork-images.

A. And I Love You So (3:57′)

An acoustic-cover of Don McLean’s 1970 folk-rock hit “And I Love You So”—which was released on his 1970 debut album, Tapestry. Its chorus features an unusual rhyming scheme for a popular song: A-B-B-A versus the usual A-B-C (or A)-B.. More songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Don McLean.

B. For Emily, Whenever I May Find Her (2:06′)

This is an acoustic-cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s 1966 folk love-song release “For (Emily), Wherever I May Find Her”—noting that Emily could be anyone whom you cared about. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Paul Simon.

C. Your Song (4:02′)

Fig. 3 – Your Song Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Elton John’s 1970 slow-rock hit “Your Song”. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Elton John/ Bernie Taupin.

D. I’ll Always Love You (3:31′)

Fig. 4 – I’ll Always Love You Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Michael Johnson’s 1979 soft-rock ballad “I’ll Always Love You”—three audio tracks and as simple as it can be, where my minimalistic instinct reigned supreme. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Steel acoustic-guitar by Romy R.; Words and music by Eric Kaz and Tom Snow.

E. One and Sixty [Four and Twenty] (2:15′)

An acoustic cover and remake of Stephen Stills’s 1970 folk-rock release “Four and Twenty”—appropriately retitled here as “One and Sixty”, as it was recorded during my 61st-birthday. More songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and steel acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Writer: Stephen Stills.

F. This Old Guitar (3:21′)

Fig. 6 – This Old Guitar Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of John Denver’s 1974 folk-rock release “This Old Guitar”—a tribute to the several-guitars that I owned, starting with the first-guitar that I bought when I was 14-yo (a Php40 Mactan-made guitar*, from the Christmas-gift proceeds given by my Uncle Celso). I always brought each of them wherever I was deployed around the world. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by John Denver.

G. Something In The Way She Moves (2:59′)

Fig. 7 – Something In The Way She Moves Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of James Taylor’s 1968 folk-rock hit “Something In The Way She Moves”—the song that inspired The Beatles’ George Harrison to create his own pop-rock version “Something”, which also became a hit in its own right. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and steel acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by James Taylor.

H. Tears In Heaven (3:13′)

Fig. 8 – Tears In Heaven Artwork

This is an acoustic cover of Eric Clapton’s 1992 slow-Rock hit “Tears In Heaven”, which he penned as tribute to his four-year-old son Conor who died after falling from a 53rd floor window of his Mom’s NY-apartment. Its lyrics are being provided below, and more song-facts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Eric Clapton.

I. If You Could Read My Mind (3:50′)

Fig. 9 – If You Could Read My Mind Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Gordon Lightfoot’s 1971 folk-rock hit “If You Could Read My Mind”. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and 2nd steel acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; 1st/ lead acoustic-guitar by Romy R.; Words and music by Gordon Lightfoot.

J. Castles In The Air (3:35′)

Fig. 10 – Castle In The Air Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Don McLean’s 1969 folk-rock hit “Castles In The Air”. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and steel acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; 2nd-guitar by Romy R.; Words and music by Don McLean.

K. I’ll Have To Say I Love You In A Song (2:09′)

This is an acoustic-cover of Jim Croce’s 1973 folk-rock hit “I’ll Have To Say I Love You In A song”—a posthumously-released single for the American singer-songwriter Jim Croce who died in a small-plane crash in September of 1973. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead nylon acoustic guitar by Romy R.; Words and Music by Jim Croce.

L. Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright (3:22′)

Fig. 12 – Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Bob Dylan’s 1963 Folk Rock hit “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright”, which was further popularized by the Peter, Paul & Mary trio shortly thereafter. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Bob Dylan/ Peter, Paul & Mary.

M. Fields Of Gold v2 (3:30′)

Fig. 13 – Fields Of Gold Artwork

This is an acoustic-cover of Sting’s 1993 slow-rock release “Fields of Gold”—also covered by Eva Cassidy. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and steel acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Lead steel acoustic-guitar by Romy R.; Words and music by Gordon Sumner and Ragupahty Dixit.

N. See The Changes (3:01′)

This is an acoustic-cover of Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young (CSNY) 1977 folk-rock release “See The Changes”. Its lyrics and more songfacts can be viewed by clicking here; and about the CSNY band here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Vocals and nylon acoustic-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Words and music by Stephen Stills/ CSNY.

O. Hug and Handshake (3:17′)

Fig. 15 – Hug and Handshake Artwork

This is one of my earlier creations which was based on my poem “Ode To Bro Ed”, both of which are tributes to the 62nd-birthday of my younger brother Eddie. Its lyrics and more song-facts can be viewed by clicking here.

Performer(s)/ Writer(s): Vocals, Nylon acoustic-guitar, Words and Music by Mon Enriquez; Acoustic bass by Boni B./ Drums & percussions by Mike D.

P. Capricho Arabe – Guitar Solo (4:00′)

Fig. 16 – Capricho Arabe Artwork

This is a guitar-solo cover of Capricho árabe (Arab Capriccio), considered to be a showpiece and classical guitar standard by Spanish composer Francisco Tárrega in 1892. This piece culminated my formal guitar-trainings and (in the process, by choice) aborted my aspirations of becoming a classical guitarist. Its music-sheet can be downloaded here, and more artistfacts can be viewed here.

Performers/ Writer(s): Classical nylon-guitar by Mon Enriquez; Music by Francisco Tarrega.

IV. Concluding Remarks

I only did covers of great songs, a number of which were Grammy award-winning songs. That is why limiting the choice to sixteen tracks was really a difficult challenge for me. Depending on the feedback that I will be receiving, a second-volume may be justified in the near future.

Plans are already underway for possible CD-publishing and online-streaming. Updates will be posted in our Facebook-page—do Visit/ Follow/ Like us there…

Fig. 17 – MF&TG Facebook Page

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